Folk and Traditional Arts

You need to be at the Creative Industry Summit, Nov. 12-13!

Kentucky artists and creative people who make all or part of their living from selling their work are the backbone of the Kentucky creative industry. Yet, many Kentucky artists don’t think of themselves as small business operators or entrepreneurs, which can create disconnect between artists and valuable resource providers when artists seek business development assistance.

Level of Need for Various Resources

Click to see this graph at actual size.

The Kentucky Creative Industry Report, released by the Kentucky Arts Council in December 2014, included important data about the Commonwealth’s creative workforce that has provided new opportunities for the arts council to address some of these issues.

As part of the study, we conducted a survey of Kentucky artists and creative freelancers. That survey gave us an overview of the needs of those who work in the creative industry. It helped us set goals and identify new avenues of assistance to better meet the needs of the state’s creative workforce.

While the survey details specific needs, when looking at the list overall (which you can find on Page 18 of the report or in the graphic to the left) many of those needs fall under one category – business training and development. We’ve addressed this in many ways this year, providing opportunities to artists and creative entrepreneurs to gain valuable skills that will help them grow their arts businesses.

The arts council is offering another great opportunity for artists to receive business training, generate ideas for growth, learn how to market and promote their work, and get in on a discussion about how to become arts leaders in their own communities through team-building. Our one-day workshop for artists and creative entrepreneurs at the Creative Industry Summit Workshops on Nov. 12 will cover all of these topics and give artists a chance to network among their peers. The workshop is $10 and features excellent speakers and workshop presenters. Check out the agenda online and register today. Have questions or need more information? Contact me at emilyb.moses@ky.gov.

Please share this exciting learning opportunity with your own networks of Kentucky artists. By doing so, you’ll be helping the arts council in its mission to strengthen and grow the state’s creative industry.

Categories: Arts Advocacy, Arts Organizations, Folk and Traditional Arts, Literary Arts, Performing Arts, Visual Arts

Remembering our great ones

The problem with a being an arts administrator is that you spend so much time administering the arts that you have little occasion to enjoy them. Wonderful opportunities offered by our Kentucky Arts Partners and program artists pass over our desk, and we lament not having the time to attend or participate in all of them.

We are pleased to report that this year, the planets aligned in such a way that we will be able to join the celebration during the Living Arts and Science Center Day of the Dead Festival at the Old Episcopal Burying Ground in Lexington.

We are creating an altar honoring late Kentucky artists with Kentucky-centric ofrendas. Our intention is to be faithful to the spirit of the traditional Dia de los Muertos celebration, while offering a cross-cultural interpretation that is also true to the Commonwealth. We look forward to learning and sharing on Nov.1 and, of course, having some fun.

 John Tuska style papel picado

Papel picado we made in the style of John Tuska, one of Kentucky’s great artists.

We will feature photos of artists who have passed like Rosemary Clooney, Bill Monroe, Rude Osolnik, Skeeter Davis, James Baker Hall and many others. Ofrendas will include all those foods and items a Kentucky artist might miss if far from home.

Heine Brothers’ Mexico Maya Vinic

There are layers upon layers of meaning in this offering of Heine Brothers’ Mexico Maya Vinic.

It’s inspiring to watch a Day of the Dead celebration become a part of the annual fall landscape in Lexington. This holiday from another country and culture certainly has resonance in a new home. This is likely because the participants — whether first –generation Kentuckians or tenth-generation Kentuckians — place a strong value on remembering those who came before. Nowhere is this value more evident than in our art. You can hear it in our musician’s songs and read in our author’s words. Kentucky’s strong sense of place has as much to with people who walked it and were inspired by it throughout their life, as it does with the land itself.

Sarah Schmitt, arts access director

Categories: Folk and Traditional Arts | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The dulcimer gets its due

The Homer Ledford Dulcimer Festival kicks off this weekend, Aug. 29-30. Then, get ready for the Hindman Dulcimer Homecoming, Nov. 6-9. What is all this festivity about, you say?

As stringed instruments go, the Appalachian mountain dulcimer is a recent development. The curvy, wooden instruments designed to rest on the player’s lap emerged in 19th-century Appalachia, borrowing characteristics from older European instruments. The dulcimer’s visual and tonal beauty, ease of tuning, portability and durability made it a popular vehicle for musical expression throughout the region. Kentucky has been a dulcimer hub thanks largely to the late-1800s dulcimer patriarch Uncle Ed Thomas of Knott County, and the 20th century’s innovative and influential Homer Ledford of Winchester. Today, enthusiastic communities of dulcimer players and listeners exist all around the world.

Master luthier Doug Naselroad just completed a Kentucky Arts Council Folk and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship, teaching apprentice Mike Slone the techniques and culture behind dulcimer building.

Sit back a few minutes with this video and hear their story about discovering their personal connections to dulcimer history, and how their work together over the last year is having a big impact on Kentucky communities.

Mark Brown, folk and traditional arts program director

Categories: Folk and Traditional Arts | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The 2014 Made in the South Contest

Garden and Gun Magazine’s fifth annual Made in the South contest is open and ready for applicants!

The contest, started in 2010, is in partnership with the Savannah College of Art and Design and features unique products in the categories of food, drink, outdoors, style and design and home. Each year, a panel of judges pick one winning entry and several honorable mentions in every category that best showcase the cultural tradition and craftsmanship found in the southern states. These artists, and the products they have contributed, are featured in the December/January issue of Garden and Gun that year. This year, the overall winner will receive a cash prize of $10,000.

I recently talked with Louisville woodworker Jason Cohen, owner of JC Woodartisan, whose bourbon barrel furniture won in the Home category in 2011, to see what suggestions he had for Kentucky artists wanting to apply.  His advice? Just do it!

Cohen, a juried participImageant of the Kentucky Crafted program, applied to Made in the South on a whim. A woodworker for more than 20 years, he spent most of his time crafting pieces on commission or repairing and restoring furniture. It wasn’t until his neighboring business, Bourbon Barrel Foods,  commissioned the unique furniture that Cohen broke into the bourbon barrel market. The stylish table and  stools he creates are what caught the attention of Garden and Gun judges.

Calling his win “one of the best things that has ever happened,” Cohen now specializes in the creation of his  unique furniture and his business has taken off in the years since.  Just recently, he completed commission of 100 stools for a new bar opening in Nashville.

To be eligible for the win, applicants must submit a specific product or related group of products that have  been designed and assembled in the south. Submissions are broad and last year’s winners included a  Florida creamery and a banjo-maker from North Carolina.

For official contest rules and to enter the Made in the South contest, visit https://www.madeinthesouthawards.com/

Good luck!  

 

 Alex Newby, Communications Assistant

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Folk and Traditional Arts, Other | Tags: , ,

Celebrating summer with Kentucky Arts Partners

With school ending for the summer, families around the state are looking for unique ways to fill the blissful summer months.  Here at the Kentucky Arts Council, we’ve highlighted a few of the programs and camps being offered by Kentucky Arts Partnership organizations this summer.

Travel WritingThe JetSet Lifestyle – Explore the world without leaving Lexington! At the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning, you’ll learn to capture your journey and share it with other adventure-seekers. Through creative writing exercises, photography, and field trips, you will learn to convert your experiences into engaging and informative stories. By the end of the week, campers will create a colorful and insightful travel presentation, featuring photographs and fiction or narratives, highlighting a noteworthy destination.

Teen Art Camp – Attention teens! It’s time to take your artistic skills to the next level this summer with the Community Arts Center in Danville! At Teen Art Camp, participants will work closely with professional local artists to delve deeper into a different artistic medium and technique each day.

Audition Skills Held at the Walden Theatre, this camp is for anyone who has thought about auditioning for a play or musical or for anyone who has an upcoming audition and wants to be prepared! Students will learn or improve the process of selecting, studying and performing a monologue, learn how to approach “cold readings” from a script, and even navigate their way through a 16-bar musical piece and a dance break. Time will be given to help create an audition package of two song cuttings (one up-tempo, one ballad) and a monologue. All levels welcome.

Puppet Antics Camp – Do you like puppets? Were you in kindergarten through third grade this year? If you answered yes to both questions, then you will love “Puppet Antics” hosted by the Richmond Area Arts Council. Here, students will make several simple puppets and learn to make them dance, sing and perform a variety of silly antics. You’ll share the fun with family and friends with your very own short puppet show at the end of the Friday session. Bring a snack for a daily break and a short puppet show. This camp is presented by Mary and Richard Brown of Puppets and Such in Berea.

Makin’ Music Junior Camp – Grandparents and grandchildren can enjoy summertime activities together at the Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington! At this camp, participants will enjoy skits, games and crafts as they learn more about music. Campers will even make some simple musical instruments of their own!

For the full list of camps and programs being offered this summer. Visit http://artscouncil.ky.gov/Opportunities/SummerCamps.htm

Categories: Arts Education, Arts Organizations, Folk and Traditional Arts, Literary Arts, Other, Performing Arts, Visual Arts | Tags: ,

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