Posts Tagged With: performing arts

A fresh StART to 2015

With 2015 on our doorstep, now is the time to take your greatest wishes and make them into tangible goals. We’ve created a list of resolutions to help you get started on a banner year. Use our list to make your own, catered to your dreams and aspirations.

*Make more time for your art
Prioritize, people! Don’t let your projects get crowded and shuffled out. Use a specific timetable or format so you won’t forget.
It might be a good idea to have a calendar in a place you visit a lot. You could make every Tuesday at noon your sketch time (or whatever usually gets shuffled out of your weekly tasks). That way, you know that when you wake up on Tuesdays…yay! It’s sketch day!
Even if it’s only a couple of hours a week…write it down on the calendar, and in permanent ink! Whatever the task is, make it the same day and time so nearly everything you do will eventually become a habit.
You may need to enroll in a class so others will hold you accountable. This could also help you get back to the basics and help you remember why you fell in love with the craft in the first place. Search our online directories to find other artists like you and contact them.

*Apply for more fellowships & grants
There are lots of opportunities out there, and no reason why you can’t apply to at least one fellowship or grant this year. To find opportunities from us, visit our website. At the top, right corner, you’ll see the “Grants” tab. Take a look around. If you have a question on one of the opportunities, find the program director responsible. Call and/or email them. It’s our job to help you.

*Network more…face to face
This may sound scary…but get out there! In every single session of the Creative Industry Summit, each speaker reiterated over and over how important it is to get conversations going about art in our communities.
Make it a point to attend events, like Kentucky Crafted: The Market, as a vendor or a shopper. Either way, I’m sure those there, or at any event, wouldn’t care to give you tips of the trade. Try not to see them as competition, but comrades. Check our online calendar for upcoming events you might like to attend. You can also go to our home page and hover your cursor over the first tab, “Kentucky Art”, then “Experience the Arts” for some.
I would also make a point to visit art retailers around the state. Click this link for a list of our Kentucky Crafted Retailers. Talk to them! Network! Share war stories!
Also, don’t think you have to attend events catered specifically to your craft. You could attend something different. For example, if you’re a painter, attend Poetry Out Loud. You never know, it could help you find inspiration for your next project.

That brings me to my next suggestion…

*Get out of your comfort zone
Make it a point to do at least one project a week that’s different than what you would usually do. This may mean a different genre, or use a different canvas size, etc.

When you do…

*Post your work online
This includes your personal websites, blogs and social media pages. Post the good, the bad and the ugly and ask for others’ opinions to get a conversation started. Post the entire process and ask for “help” on what to do next. You never know, your fans may even want to buy something because they’re proud they helped you in the process. They may want to invest in your creativity.

Share your resolutions with us in the comments of our blog, or on our social media pages!

Megan Williamson Fields, communications assistant

Categories: Other | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Have a holly jolly Kentucky Christmas

Elf rules:
1. Treat every day like Christmas
2. There’s room for everybody on the nice list
And most importantly, #3:
giphyI love Christmas music. The yuletide tunes help spark the fire of the holiday spirit in your belly every time (especially if some of the holiday spirit in your belly is also eggnog). However, if you’re like me, you may also become tired of the same songs over and over. Let me help you switch things up a bit. Artists from our Performing Arts Directory offer their own take on Christmas through a wide range of genres, and we’ve put together a list for you.


For more music from Kentucky artists and ways to purchase albums, visit our Performing Artist page, or our Give the Gift of Music site. You can also check out our schedule of performances by Performing Arts Directory artists and at Kentucky Arts Partners performing arts venues from our Give the Gift of Performance site.

Feel free to play your new tunes in the background of Christmas parties. I’m sure your guests have heard the classics. Now, you can give them the gift of a Kentucky Christmas.

Heed a little warning from me: Switching up your seasonal songs could make you nostalgic for the classic Christmas carols of yore. It makes sense. I know I can’t leave behind the tradition of my dad yelling “BURL IVES!” at the end of every sentence the crooner sings. It may be a good idea to slowly incorporate these new goodies into your already-extensive stockpile of oldies.

by Megan Williamson Fields, KAC communications assistant

Categories: Other | Tags: , , , , , ,

Give the gift of performance

The calendar couldn’t do it, but the snow last week has finally moved me into a state of elation over the possibility that Christmas will be here soon — Hooray! I’ll be watching my TV listings for Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, How the Grinch Stole Christmas (animated version, of course), and my must-see, A Charlie Brown Christmas — it wasn’t such a bad little tree. And with the notes of those familiar theme songs, I have to admit that it’s time to do some shopping.

I love my family and friends, but we often don’t share the same taste and I anguish for weeks and months about what to get “Aunt So-And-So” or “Cousin What’sHisName.” No way I’m buying anyone a tie or a fruit cake. And Sue, my BFF in fourth grade, put the fear of god in me as far as paper dolls as an appropriate Christmas gift. (Does anyone still make paper dolls?) Even toy shopping is stressful.

Some experts say to give gifts that you like. That certainly makes it easier. And how about gifts that you like and your family and friends will love? Of course — gifts that keep giving, music and dance! One of my very favorite things in the world is live performance and the next best thing is a recorded performance. Tickets to shows or CDs and DVDs make excellent gifts for anyone, anywhere, anytime! If I’m on your Christmas list, I’ll take two of each.

The Kentucky Arts Council has put together a listing of live performances by some of the performers in its Performing Arts Directory. All Performing Arts Directory artists go through a rigorous panel process in order to be included in the directory and you can rest assured these artists are among the very best. I began doing my Snoopy dance as soon as I saw the range of live performances available this season. From classics like Lexington Children’s Theatre’s The Best Christmas Pageant Ever and Lexington Ballet Company’s The Nutcracker to the enchanting Yule Y’all, a Celtic celebration with Keltricity and the Chattering Magpies and the Louisville Orchestra’s Christmas Spectacular. And that just scratches the surface. With all the exciting performances on the list, your Christmas shopping can be done in a heartbeat and you can sit back and enjoy the show along with the applause from all your delighted friends. Ticket prices are excellent–some are even free. Have a look at the listing and take your favorite people out to enjoy a live performance, or two, or three!

Image

Heath and Molly’s three CD holiday gift pack, a perennial favorite.

If you can’t get everyone together to go to the show, have a look at our listing of Performing Arts Directory artists CDs and DVDs. Each has been recently released and will provide hours of entertainment value to the lucky so-and-so who gets them. From Latin-mountain fusion artists’ Appalatin to rock-and-rooters Heath and Molly, the Lexington Ballet Company to the Louisville Chorus, gypsy jazz by Stirfry Musette to Lexington Vintage Dance–oh my, so much to enjoy! And there’s still more — cowgirl fun by Raison D’Etre, folk music by LaMay & Reese, good ol’ country music by Dale Pyatt and the Chickengrease Band and wait, we aren’t done yet…There’s too much to capture in one short blog post. With so much music and dance to choose from, every Who in Who-ville will be thrilled and even the Grinch will rejoice!

Tamara Coffey, individual artists director

Categories: Performing Arts | Tags: , , , , , , ,

2013 Governor’s Awards in the Arts: Ed White

Meeting River City Drum Corps Founder Ed White, of Louisville, was one of the best experiences I had while interviewing the 2013 Governor’s Awards in the Arts recipients. I was energized for weeks after my conversation with Ed and kept referring back to my interview with him to reread some of the wisdom he shared with me.

Ed grew up in Louisville’s west end. As a child he was drawn to the arts but did not have ample opportunity for participation. Due to his involvement with a local Boys Club, he was naturally exposed to sports and played for years, even though his heart wasn’t in it. Ed eventually ended up being a director at a Boys Club and found it was still a sports-focused atmosphere. He decided it was time to incorporate the arts into the system, making art available at the same level as sports. During the next few years, with opportunities to learn through programs like Arts Reach Kentucky, Ed developed the tools he needed to start the River City Drum Corps.

I talked to Ed for more than two hours the day we met. I think if he hadn’t had other things to do, I’d still be there talking with him. What you will read in this interview about the drum corp barely makes a dent in Ed’s personal story and experiences. It is without pretense I say: Ed White, the 2013 Governor’s Awards in the Arts Folk Heritage Award recipient, makes me proud to be a Kentuckian.

What is the process like when kids sign up for the River City Drum Corps? What do they learn?

The first thing they learn is discipline. The first thing I have to do is get them to be able to stand still before I can teach them anything. After they get over that learning curve, we deal in drum making. Usually you have to be in drum corps a year before you get to make your drum. Then we start talking about African history and culture. We have a culture class every other Saturday, which is mandatory for them to come and to learn history, to learn culture, to learn games to let them understand the value of the team concept. It’s not a team concept where we have super stars, where everybody doesn’t get to play. It’s a concept where everybody is a part of the process and you rise through grasping the process. Our method is, we use the students as teachers. So we’re constantly teaching, I call it teaching down. As you teach down, the children grow up. And as they grow up, they’re continually teaching down. So the process keeps continually revolving around the idea, so that each child has ownership. It’s leadership development. It’s a leadership development program using arts and culture. They become the show managers, they become the booking agents – it’s the process of teaching them how the drum corps works. Basically, all I do now is just drive them – some shows I don’t even go in the building – so that they understand and they grasp the concept of the energy and power they have within themselves.

Why is it important to make your own drums instead of purchase drums?

It connects you to the culture. The drum in Africa is the foundation of culture. Celebrations, births, deaths, weddings, war, planting, harvest season. The drum is the foundation of life, ceremonies and culture. When I was in Ghana, I went to Tamale to meet with this group called the Tamale Youth Group. They do the same thing I do with the drums. They use it to teach children as a foundation, so their culture doesn’t get lost because of the influences of Western society. So they teach children to make drums, but also they teach them the purpose of the drum – they teach them to make fabric, to tie-dye – the whole thing about their culture, with the drum as the foundation of it. When you make things you tap into the creative spirit. So when a child takes raw materials and fashions this drum, then their spirit is connected to it. Again, that’s the power of art. The power of art is the connection of your spirit to whatever image you create. That’s what that’s about; that’s the reasoning, why. Once they do it, ownership is created.

Tell me a little about the kids who are in the drum corps.

I have children from all over the city, from all socioeconomic backgrounds. You know you hear people say ‘at-risk.’ But everybody’s at-risk, because all of us are one or two paychecks away from being out on the street. The gamut runs large and very diverse on the backgrounds of children that I get. Everybody’s looking for something and this is something that they find.

Because they are able to participate in the River City Drum Corps, what opportunities are available to them that weren’t available to you? You talked earlier about how the emphasis was on sports, but your heart was in the arts. Was it important to you to create those opportunities you didn’t have?

Yes. See, I couldn’t afford drumming. That was something I knew I couldn’t do, but it was easy for sports. Buying instruments was something that would not happen. But my mother could take her children to the Boys Club and everybody would get something.

There are so many things we do that get our children out of our community, so they see different things, they see different people. They understand it’s a different world out here.

Can you reflect on how the River City Drum Corps has been important to you personally? What personal achievements have you experienced?

When children that the world said “they can’t make it,” make it.

I look at my children who are first-generation college graduates. I look at them who have gone to school for free. I look at a young man who was from a family of superstar athletes. I see families who understand the power of education and drive their children to succeed, to grab it.

I’m glad that I met Bob Gates (former state folklorist). Bob Gates was one of the few people that I know who understands the power of culture. And he understands it. If we could get more people to understand the power of culture we could solve a whole lot of problems.

This work for me is my purpose. I’ve done a whole lot of things. I was a welder. I rebuilt cars. I worked in the atomic energy plant reprocessing uranium to build bombs. I’ve done several other little loose jobs. All of the rest of them, with the exception of maybe photography, was without purpose. This is my purpose.

Emily B. Moses, communications director

Categories: Performing Arts | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: