Posts Tagged With: Uncommon Wealth

Put this on your Market to-do list

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Typical Market checklist

When you go to Kentucky Crafted: The Market – because you are going, right? – you will encounter some of the best Kentucky has to offer in visual art, craft, music, and more. Your schedule will be tight. You will be busy going from aisle to aisle, talking to artists whose work you like the most, sampling food, collecting books, doing fun art activities with kids, and hearing master musicians play fiddle, guitar, banjo, Chinese pipa, marching drums, dulcimer, and washboard.

Between doing all those things, take a few minutes to view the special exhibit sampler in Heritage Hall, near the Kentucky Stage. You will be glad you did. For the first time ever, the Kentucky Arts Council is bringing together a sampler of three of our prized exhibits: Uncommon Wealth, identity, and The Makings of a Master.

Each exhibit includes amazing art that offers you new perspectives on arts scenes across Kentucky:

  • Uncommon Wealth features Al Smith Fellowship recipients over the past 30 years, recognized for their creative excellence.
  • identity features work by artists who have disabilities of many different kinds, which may or may not influence their identities as artists.
  • The Makings of a Master: Kentucky Folk Art Apprenticeships presents examples of the wonderful folk art that is created during the critical and momentous times when a master tradition-bearer teaches an apprentice.

Not only will you see all this artwork in one place, you will get to meet some of the artists as they work:

On Saturday, March 8, master basket maker Paul Rich of Mammoth Cave, Ky., and his apprentice Tim Brewster will demonstrate their acclaimed white oak basket style that developed over generations along Highway 31W in south central Ky. To find out more, visit the Mammoth Cave basketmakers’ website.

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Dr. Jim Middleton and Paul Rich at the 2006 white oak basket contest in Hart County

On Sunday, March 9, master quilter Patricia Brennan of Fort Thomas, Ky., will display and work on her beautiful quilts with her apprentice Helen Bailey. Visit their blog to find out more.

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Log cabin square

A stop at the exhibit sampler will be well worth your while, and will help make this one of the best Markets yet. See you there!

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Top secret exhibit sampler floor-plan drawn on a marker board, photographed with a bowtie that’s really a camera

Mark Brown, folk and traditional arts program director

Categories: Other | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Uncommon Wealth

Kentucky is home to talented artists of all kinds, and the best part of my job is working with them. I have worked in arts administration for several years. My favorite thing is interacting with artists and helping them with their careers — whether that is by including their work in an exhibit; introducing them to other like-minded artists; talking or writing about their work; or helping them to find funding, get commissions or sell work. This is a generalized statement, but one that I feel is also true: Artists are a wonderful group of people to work with. They are, by and large, down-to-earth, kind and friendly people. They are hard workers and are vastly appreciative of any help they receive. They are modest when praised and untrusting of false compliments. They are interesting people to talk with and a pleasure to work with. It is very satisfying and fulfilling to know that I was able to assist an artist, because in an indirect way, that means more art will be added to the world. To this artist and arts administrator, that is always a good thing.

In 2006, I worked for the Lexington Art League as visual art director. We partnered with the Kentucky Arts Council to present an exhibit of work by recipients of the arts council’s Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowships. Uncommon Wealth, the exhibit, was on view at the Loudoun House in Lexington in the summer of 2006. It featured work by 73 artists who were past recipients of fellowships, and I was fortunate enough to personally meet many of them. The exhibit later traveled to venues around the state. Fast forward seven years later. Now, I work for the arts council and I am honored and pleased to have the opportunity to work with the same group of artists, plus the ones added to the list since 2006, on a new version of Uncommon Wealth, on view now through Jan. 11, 2014, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.

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In 2013, the arts council celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Al Smith Individual Artist Fellowship Program. The fellowship program was established in 1983 to recognize creative excellence and to assist in the professional development of Kentucky artists. Since then, the arts council has awarded more than $2.5 million in funding to individual artists. This is hugely significant at a time when many other state arts agencies have cut funding to individual artists due to tight budgets. The arts council truly supports the work of artists.  But more than monetary support, the fellowship serves as a seal of approval of sorts, a validation of the work that artists do, which inspires and encourages artists. This program is all about assisting artists, so that they can continue to do what they do best: Add more art to the world.

Uncommon Wealth is a perfect example of the range of work that you find in Kentucky, from traditional crafts to conceptual work. The exhibit has painting, photography, prints and drawings. There are sculptures and furniture, ceramics and jewelry. Furthermore, the gallery at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center is a beautiful venue, with expansive walls and an abundance of natural light. It is an underused treasure of the Lexington art scene. To be able to feature 62 artists in this exhibit, in such a beautiful venue, is a joy.

Please join us Friday night during Gallery Hop, 5 to 8 p.m., to see the exhibit, admire the gallery space, and support the work of some exceptional Kentucky artists. Help us add more art to the world!

Gallery Hop at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center; Friday, Nov. 15, 5-8 p.m. The Lyric is located at 300 E. Third St., Lexington. Light refreshments will be served. Uncommon Wealth will be on view at the Lyric through Jan. 11, 2014.

Kate Sprengnether,administrative associate

Categories: Visual Arts | Tags: , , , , , ,

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